Nina at Work November 2016

HOW FAR DO YOU GO?

Mijke Lievens, Fallpipe vessel operations
“If equipment needs to be modified for a project I am the link between the different departments and the vessel. We think about every change with a lot of people, but still you miss details; it never completely fits the way you planned it.


NINA START-UP AT ASTICAN SHIPYARD, SPAIN

“THIS IS NO ‘STANDARD’ SAFETY MEETING.”
Yard projects are challenging. A NINA Start-up meeting enables the Boskalis repair team and the yard personnel to discuss the work scope and their mutual expectations with regard to safety. At the Astican Shipyard in Spain, where the SMIT Nicobar is being repaired, this turned out very well.


‘FIT FOR DUTY 2.0’ IN SOUTH KOREA

Maikel van der Gracht, Pool operations trainee
I notice that the NINA program is broadly supported within the organization. On each project we pay a lot of attention to it. I also notice that other companies are starting to see the added value of NINA. I saw a good example of this in South Korea, during the dredging of an entrance channel for shipping.


ESTABLISHING GOOD TEAMWORK IN COLOMBIA

Santiago Martinez, Project Manager in Cartagena, Colombia shares his experience with the role of NINA in forming a team.


TALKING YOUR HEAD OFF FOR SAFETY

Salvage master Sylvia Tervoort was in charge of the salvage operation of the oil platform Transocean Winner, which had grounded at the Hebrides, Scotland. In contrary to most salvage operations not SMIT Salvage, but the owner, Transocean, was responsible for the whole operation. This asked for continuous and intensive consultation: “If the safety is at stake you may never be silent.”